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Bird Feeding 101

Bird Feeding

November 23 | 10:00 am - 11:00 am

|Recurring Event (See all)

One event on November 23, 2019 at 10:00 am

Bird Feeding 101: A How-To Workshop
Included with general admission to the VINS Nature Center
VINS Members: Free

Three billion. That is the estimated number of individual birds lost in North America since 1970 according to a study published last month in Science. While it is not clear exactly why our ecosystems are less able to support birdlife, there are many simple steps individuals can take to improve the world for birds right in their own backyard.

Feeding birds and creating a bird-friendly habitat is a great way to help wildlife and attract color and life to your yard during winter. But how does one get started, what is the best type of food and how do you identify your backyard visitors? Come learn from the experts at VINS.

Whether you are a first-time feeder or have been doing it for some time and want to learn more, VINS staff will introduce you to the birds you can expect to visit your feeders, explain what types of feeders and feed are best and show you how to turn your yard into a bird-friendly habitat. Additionally, learn how you can become a part of the global citizen science effort, Project FeederWatch. The observations submitted by Project FeederWatch participants – ordinary volunteers who enjoy watching birds at their feeders each winter, are used by researchers to track bird populations around the country and the world.

Afterwards, shop our bird-friendly products at the VINS Nature Store and receive a 10% discount on all bird feeding items including feeders, field guides and window deterrents.

Together we can turn this dire trend around by helping local wildlife. For more information check out 3billionbirds.org, and learn how to take a few simple actions to help birds thrive.

Please arrive by 9:45 am. For more information, contact us at 802.359.5000 or info@vinsweb.org.

Black-capped Chickadee. Photo: Toni Herkalo-Koch/Audubon Photography Awards.